61.3 F
New York
Tuesday, June 2, 2020

Georgia Elects First Black Woman Judge

Must read

This Day in History: May 31st

Greenwood Section of Tulsa, Oklahoma is Destroyed By a Racist Mob It was known as the Tulsa Race Riot. But...

Ghana Takes The World Robofest Championships

An all-girls robotics team from Ghana scored the top spot at the World Robofest Championship held in Southfield, Michigan.

This Day in History: May 25th

On this day in 2019, U.S. Academy at West Point graduated 32 black women—the most in its 216-year history. In 2018, the military academy...

Kirk’s #GoVeggies 31-Day Challenge, Day 25: Are Supplements Necessary?

Dietary supplementation is something most nutritionists agree on. With depleted soil, genetic modification, nutrient deficient soil and polluted air and water, there’s...
The Hub News Staff
The Hub News Staffhttps://thehub.news
Curators and highlighters of news and accomplishments from the Global Majority. From tech to books, wellness to money, throughout the diaspora we are bringing content that is both unique and focused on showing the world our best.

Ronda Colvin-Leary, who became the first black person elected to the Gwinnett State Court in the county’s history in May, was sworn in yesterday. Colvin-Leary has been a member of the Georgia bar since 2001 and was solicitor for the city of Windsor while running her own law practice in Lawrenceville for the last decade.

Her election is significant because it sends a signal of change, that people are paying attention to how these seats impact their lives.

Colvin-Leary’s Gwinnett County State Court handles civil actions, misdemeanors and traffic violations. She told the Atlanta Journal-Constitution that she likes the court’s role in the judicial system because it can address more minor legal issues before they may escalate.

“I love State Court because, for me, I like to think that … if you come to State Court we can try to address it before something else major happens and you wind up in Superior Court for a more serious offense,” Colvin-Leary said.

Federally, 215 judges are black. And only 14% of district court judges are black (71% are white) in a system that is disproportionately black.

White men make up 58% of state court judges, while making up less than a third of the population. Less than one-third of state judges are women, and only 20% are people of color. In Texas, for example, where about 40% of the population is Latino, only 5 of the 76 justices who have served on the Texas Supreme Court since 1945 have been Latino. That’s 6.6%.

“This is a wonderful time in the history of Gwinnett County,” said Gwinnett County NAACP Pres. Renita Hamilton Edmonson, of Colvin-Leary ‘s election. “The significance of this event reflects the spirit of diversity, the melting of prejudices and welcomed change.”

Georgia is looking to test this theory in November as Stacey Abrams is poised to become to the first black woman governor in the history of the nation.

Previous articleMichelle Hope
Next articleThis Is Sonnie Johnson
- Advertisement -

More articles

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

- Advertisement -

Latest article

Kirk’s #GoVeggies 31-Day Challenge, Day 23: Does Your Body Attack Itself?

With autoimmune diseases, your body will attack itself, which never made sense to me. I always wondered what causes your immune system...

Kirk’s #GoVeggies 31-Day Challenge, Day 22: Does Meat Cause Cancer?

What is it about meat that makes it so toxic to the human body?  As humans we’re not biologically suited to eat...

This Day in History: May 20th

Born This Day in 1743, Here Are 5 Things To Know About Toussaint L'Ouverture  Toussaint L'Ouverture was the...

This Day in History: May 17th

Racial Segregation in Public Schools Ruled Unconstitutional One of the cornerstone cases of the Civil Rights Movement, Brown...

Kirk’s #GoVeggies 31-Day Challenge, Day 15: Cheese is as Addictive as Drugs!

After years of working with clients, I’ve concluded that cheese is a highly addictive food! When most people come to me for help,...