This Day in History: March 30th

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Time Travel Scientist, Dr. Ronald Mallett, Was Born

Time travel is possible and scientist Ronald Mallett is close to figuring it out. He became interested in time travel at the age of 10, when his father, his hero, died. He wanted to go back in time to save his life. Mallett started reading science-fiction magazines and books and that’s where he got the idea that time isn’t how we think of it, it’s a scientific equation that can be cracked. And he was determined to figure it out.

Mallett was born March 30, 1945, in Roaring Springs, Pa. His family moved to the Bronx, New York, where he and his three siblings grew up. His father, Boyd, who was an engineer and an electrician, died of a massive heart attack at the age of 33. This devastated young Ron and led him on a journey to turn back the hands of time.

An avid reader as a child, Mallett encountered the writings of scientist Albert Einstein, which ultimately sparked his inspiration. He continuously read science books throughout his teenage years and planned to attend college utilizing the G.I. Bill, which supports United States military veterans in their post-service education. Mallett enlisted in the US Air Force and served four years, which included deployment to Vietnam.

In 1969, Mallett received his bachelor’s degree in physics from Pennsylvania State University and by 1973, he earned his Ph.D. in physics, making him one of the first African-Americans to earn a doctorate in theoretical physics. After receiving his Ph.D., Mallett worked as a research scientist at the United Technologies Research Laboratory for two years before becoming a professor in the department of physics at the University of Connecticut in 1975.

His passion for physics has always been there, however, he kept much of his research information to himself until the 1990s when time travel was starting to become a popular research subject and a fellow colleague encouraged him to pursue the field.

Mallett specializes in theoretical general relativity and relativistic quantum mechanics. Research areas of most interest to Mallett include the classical and quantum theory of black holes, relativistic cosmology, gauge theories, quantum gravity and of course, time travel. Throughout the years, Dr. Malllett has developed scientific equations and principles that he says could be used in creating a time machine.

In 2013, Mallett became Professor Emeritus for the Department of Physics at UCONN, where he continues to work with aspiring scientists. Outside of being a scientist and professor, Mallett has published Time Traveler: A Scientist’s Personal Mission to Make Time Travel a Reality and he has become a hot topic for many films and documentaries. 

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